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White-fronted Bee-eaters

White-fronted Bee-eaters
If you have been so lucky to have visited Mashatu Game Reserve, I’m certain the aesthetic beauty of one particular bird stood out whilst driving (walking, or cycling for that matter) through the wilderness. The White-fronted Bee-eater is one of Mashatu’s most striking birds; their plumage displays bold colours of green, white, red, blue,black and orange. The White-fronted Bee-eater is not only a feast for the eyes; the birds are skilled in flight and excellent hunters. They acquire a unique ability to hunt down insects – of which they favour bee’s, in flight and consume them without...
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Rutting Season

Rutting Season
The rutting season is upon us. And with it comes the battle for the strongest, best looking, biggest horned, and most agile Impala.   The bush is filled with ‘roars’ this time of year, but not that of the big and hairy, the roars of dominant male impala. As a male impala seeks  the attention from a female impala he emits a ‘roar’, often accompanied by a loud snorting sound. Oddly enough, the loud snorting sound is what determines the dominance of the males to the females – thus making them fit partners to breed with. During the processes of winning over the female impala, the male...
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The Cuckoo Con

The Cuckoo Con
Brood parasitism is another one of nature’s cruel yet clever survival tactics, and the cuckoo is one of its biggest culprits. Out and about in the field one day we came across a very peculiar relationship – a Meves Starling feeding a juvenile Greater Spotted Cuckoo. The cuckoo twice the size of the exhausted starling was incessantly demanding food whilst it sat upon its perch basking. The cuckoo went so far as to peck the starling off the perch once it had kindly delivered food to it, as if to say “I’m not done yet, so go and get me some more”. This Poor starling had without a choice fallen...
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